This is an issue that will again bring you around the world. We start from Canada, and follow Carmelinda Scian’s memory across the Atlantic and back to Portugal. Then Mary Morris, JR Walsh, Christine Sneed, Alan May bring us back to the states with moments that very often transcend the limits of geography. We are then sent, by Liam Liddy and John O’Dell, to the fictive Limerick, which is at times hilarious, mysterious, sad, and yet, real. Barbara Black’s poem then shows us thirteen ways of looking at a father’s passing, and Aimee Parkison’s flash examines ways “to become another woman.” Gerald Fleming’s story again brings us across the Atlantic to meet with this lonely old man in a Paris park with his nurse. We also hear the fear of a Cyprus woman in Maria A. Ioannou’s creative nonfiction piece, and the fear of looking at a father disfigured by misfortune in Avital Gad-Cykman’s flash. Srinivas S then brings us to the streets of Hong Kong, which is followed by Heather Diamond’s visit of Harbin. We are brought by Viola Lee to look at our body, our language, and the lessons we learn from the son’s biology lesson before poet and photographer Man Fai Wong sends us to Taipei, Lisbon, and Macau. We are ushered into the fictive world of Ronald Alexander before we are led by Neil Martin across the Pacific to some poetic moments in Shanghai and Sydney. We are then carried back across the Pacific again to Patricia L. Meek’s Texas where “A Bird’s Gotta Fly.” Imogen Arate’s “Suddenly” mediates between the East and the West before Vikram Kapur brings us to an India where a professor finally fulfills a certain form of redemption.

 

We hope this issue can help remind us how our world is still connected, in joy and in pain, even during the time of COVID-19, and we would like to dedicate this issue to the memory of three of our contributors to our last issue, Javier Reverte, Patrick Early, and Mark Whelan, who unfortunately passed away in the past few months.

The Hong Kong Review, Vol II, No.3

SKU: 007
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